Tag Archives: inflation

A Museum Worth 100 Marcs

Economists are forever complaining about the public’s ignorance of economics. You can’t really blame the public: most of what academic economists produce these days is incomprehensible to anyone who hasn’t earned an A in advanced econometrics, and far too much of what economists say in less technical settings is driven more by political biases or commercial interests than by conclusive research. There’s a lot economists don’t know, and too often you won’t find them admitting it.

That said, there are some important economic concepts that people need to grasp to reach their own judgments about economic issues. Many U.S. high schools now seek to teach such things, with mixed success. On a recent trip to Mexico City I saw what might be a more promising approach than classroom lectures, the Interactive Museum of the Economy, known by its Spanish acronym as MIDE.

MIDE, housed in an eighteenth-century convent in the center of Mexico City, claims to be the world’s first museum dedicated to economics. Its target audience is high school students, large numbers of whom come to visit each week. Costs are covered by a modest admission fee and substantial contributions from the Banco de Mexico, the central bank, and private financial institutions.

The museum is short on artifacts, long on hands-on activities that introduce such concepts as scarcity, division of labor, comparative advantage, and the trade-off between consumption and investment. Exhibits don’t just talk about the role of banks in society and the effects of inflation, but offer screens students can use to explore how bank deposits are invested and see how prices for different commodities change at different rates. Docents barely older than the visitors roam the exhibit halls, answering questions and drawing together small groups to play table games that also teach economic ideas, while more experienced educators offer brief programs in screen-filled rooms just off the exhibition floor. After you’ve learned about the role of money in society, you can order up a hundred-peso note issued by the Bank of the Bethlehemites–the religious order that formerly owned the building–and featuring your own image.

Mexico, of course, is a vast country, and most high school students will never have the opportunity to visit the museum. MIDE is now developing an app to make itself accessible to students all over the country.

I’ve never come across a museum quite like this before. Sure, many central banks operate their own museums, but most of them are, to be polite about it, places a teenager would never think of setting foot in. There’s much to be said for making learning about economics a fun social activity rather than an unpleasant obligation. Washington, where I live, has museums about everything from the bible to the U.S. Navy. A hands-on museum about how the economy works would be a fine addition.

Running Hot

This morning I had a great opportunity to discuss my new book, An Extraordinary Time, live on the C-Span program Washington Journal. The host, John McArdle, was thoroughly prepared, and I found it a great relief to be able to talk about the history of the 1970s and 1980s without ending up in a conversation about Donald Trump. You can see the program here.

Viewers phoned in with a number of good questions. A key point I tried to make in responding is that the basic economic trends I write about, the slowdown in productivity growth after 1973 and the related slowdown in income growth, occurred across all the wealthy economies in Western Europe, North America, and Japan. Every day, it seems, we hear comments from politicians that they know exactly how to make our economy grow as fast as it did in the good old days. Some of the callers to Washington Journal echoed those views, blaming slow growth on something they don’t like–President Obama’s environmental policies, high CEO pay, budget deficits, tax treatment of carried interest, and so forth. I think it’s useful to point out to such people that since the end of the Golden Age in 1973 we’ve seen slower growth and higher unemployment in countries where none of those policies are in place. You may not like the low tax rate on carried interest, but it’s a considerable stretch to claim that it is causing our economy to grow at 2% a year rather than 5%.

Sometimes we get a bit carried away with our own power and insist we can make the economy roar like we think it ought to. The current lingo for this is to “run the economy hot.” What advocates of that approach seem to mean is that we should accept a higher inflation rate as a tradeoff for lower unemployment and big wage increases. As I explain in my book, this is not a new idea. We spent most of the 1970s believing that we could keep unemployment low if we were willing to accept just a little more inflation. That ended badly, and I’m not eager to repeat the experiment.